Volunteering

Over the weekend a group of my pet sitters and I went to Animal Care & Control to volunteer for a few hours. For several years now I have wanted to get a group of sitters together for volunteering but time always seemed to slip by quickly and the year ends before I have a chance to catch my breath. This year, however, we managed to take moment and I am so glad we did.

1My team and I were deciding on where to volunteer, there are so many choices, among them The Charlotte Humane Society and Animal Care & Control and ultimately my sitters chose Animal Care & Control and I was thrilled. Animal Control often gets a bad wrap but after spending the day with their team, I can confidently say, they are one of the biggest pet advocates in the city.

Their intake levels have been down, which is excellent, and they have invested a lot of time into pet enrichment, education, vaccines and spay/neuter services for the community. I could not be prouder of the work they are doing for the animals in our county. We learned quite a bit about their animal intake process and discovered that they care for more than just cats and dogs. They take in bunnies, birds, horses and they even once cared for a monkey, who they found a home for in a sanctuary in California.7

Our morning of volunteering consisted of cleaning food bowls and kitty crates, filling Kongs and treat containers and, of course, playing with and loving on cats and dogs!

As our time was nearing an end, I knew the reality of our fun morning would be coming. We were about to pack up and ship out, leaving behind these adorable, loving pets. Pets who need a home. Pets who need a caring family and someone who will adore them the way they adore us. Someone to count on, to have fun with, to bond with.

Talking with one of the volunteer dog walkers, she said the hardest part of volunteering 4was leaving, “I would sit in my car and cry in the parking lot for ten minutes after I left. I just felt so bad, how could you not?” Eventually she was able to turn her sad frustration into a positive experience. She has made it her mission to bring as much joy to the dogs she walks during the time she has with them. And what more could you ask for in a volunteer?

It took a lot of self restraint not to leave with two kitties and a little chihuahua myself and one of my sitters nearly walked away with another husky. What made leaving easier for us was seeing the lobby full of people there to adopt. A few people even brought their current pets along in hopes of finding a four-legged child brother or sister. It was fantastic to see. 6

Adopting a dog can be scary at first, you never know where they have been or how they have been treated. But there is nothing more rewarding than being able to give a second life to these pets. I cannot vouch for every city’s Animal Control program, but the one we spent the day with has a dog trainer who works with the dogs that come in. The trainer assesses their personalities and works on basic training and socialization so these pups are ready for their new homes.

The sitters and I left Animal Care & Control Saturday morning with a new mission- sign up 5to become regular, long-term volunteers.  We want to continue to help give back to the community in the best way we know how, by loving on and caring for pets in whatever capacity we can.

I really encourage anyone looking to volunteer to look into your local Animal Control program, I think you might be surprised at how much they do in your community. I also strongly encourage anyone looking to add a pet into your home to consider adoption.
The majority of pets in shelters and rescues are lost and abandoned pets that are never reclaimed.

These pets touched my heart and encouraged me and my staff to get started on a monthly volunteer basis and help with education about shelter pets. I hope you will let these pets touch your heart too!

 

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Pet ID Tags

Why do so many pets end up in shelters? Whether it is the local Humane Society, Animal Control or in one of the many local animal rescue organizations?

Just under 80 million households in the United States own a pet and around 30 million of those households own more than one pet- that’s a lot of four legged family members!

However, between 6-8 million cats and dogs enter shelters each year. That’s a lot of four legged family members that go missing. And despite the common misconception, animal shelters are comprised of more strays and missing pets than pets turned in by the owners. Strays enter shelters at a rate two times higher than those consciously turned over and on average at least 50% of shelter populations are cats.

How are so many lost pets, ending up in shelters each year and what can be done about it? Well, as I found out, the answer is really quite simple- ID tags. Nearly all pets that enter shelters as strays do so because they do not have proper identification. This really makes sense when you look at the amount of cats in shelters.

I see this happen often: cat parents who keep their cats indoors at all times do not feel a need for collars with tags. And trust me, I get it, I do not want to listen to that incessant jingling and ringing of tags all day and especially all night. But it only takes one second for your cat to get curious or spooked and slip out the door while you’re unloading groceries or bringing in that heavy package.

Don’t worry cat parents, you are not alone, dog parents go through this same line of reasoning too. I know because I am one of them. Not all of my kitties have collars on and while my dog’s collar has ID tags, I never leave it on my dog when inside.

Getting your pet microchipped is important for those, like me, who do not always leave a collar on their pet. But making sure to keep the microchip updated is just as important as getting it done in the first place. There is a lot to keep track of when moving and updating your pet’s microchip address is not always on the top of your list. Getting a new phone and having to alert your contacts with your new number- do not forget your pet’s microchip company! If your pet ever gets loose and found by a good samaritan, you do not want to miss that call because your pet’s microchip lead to a dead phone number. The good news is that the majority of microchip companies have a 24 hour hotline to call for updating information.

So take a quick moment right now to make sure your pet’s information is current!